Electric-assist bicycle company Veo joins Seattle’s bike-sharing fleet

Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) announced the inclusion of Veo in the city’s bike share program, adding a second supplier after a successful first partnership with Lime.

Veo joins Lime in providing e-bikes that smartphone users can rent digitally. With the company’s respective app, simply associate a payment method to verify a bike and return it to a designated and safe area at the end of your ride. Electrically assisted motors help users of all physical abilities tackle Seattle’s rugged hills with the electric assist button on the handlebars.

Seattle’s bike and scooter sharing programs give locals the ability to quickly get around the city without a car, reducing traffic jams. According to the SDOT blog, there have been nearly 2.9 million bike share trips in the city since 2019 and 9.8 million kilometers traveled by bike share.

LimeBike, one of two new dockless bike sharing programs, placed public use bikes across town, including these two in the Lower Queen Anne, on July 26, 2017. Bikes are available unlocked via an app and do not come with headsets. (Genna Martin, seattlepi.com)Genna Martin / SeattlePI.com

SDOT also estimates that 2.2 million kilometers traveled using the scooter-sharing program. Added to the kilometers of self-service bicycles, that’s 12 million kilometers traveled. SDOT did the math and found that this is equivalent to circling the Earth 482 times or traveling 50 times from Earth to the Moon. So it’s clear that Seattle’s ride sharing programs are popular.

At the end of your trip, it’s important to park your bike or scooter properly to avoid safety issues. The city has several rules that bike-sharing participants must follow when exiting their ride. Bicycles and scooters must be parked on the outside edge of the sidewalk near trees, poles or other facilities so as not to obstruct pedestrian traffic. Public bicycle parks or bicycle racks are also good places.

Parking is not allowed in corners, aisles or access ramps and you cannot block access to buildings, benches, parking terminals, but to stops, fire hydrants or any other similar item. The bicycle or scooter must be parked upright.

The Veo Halo eBike is designed for durability and easy riding for a wide variety of riders.  An advanced torque sensor automatically adjusts to the user's pedaling to assist when needed.  The Halo eBike is classified as a Class 1 e-bike.

The Veo Halo eBike is designed for durability and easy riding for a wide variety of riders. An advanced torque sensor automatically adjusts to the user’s pedaling to assist when needed. The Halo eBike is classified as a Class 1 e-bike.

Veo / veoride.com

SDOT encourages users to use their good judgment and do the right thing, asking that bicycles and scooters not be parked in anyone’s path or somewhere the next user couldn’t find.


Veo offers reduced rates to low-income people using the Veo Access program, supporting their mission to bring mobility services to everyone. More details can be found on the program site.

If you’re ready to roll, sign up on the Veo website or check out SDOT’s self-service bike page to learn more.



Barbara M. Stokes